The Seattle Seahawks announced that they’re donating $100,000 to the Seattle Foundation to help combat systemic racism against Black people.

The Seahawks’ donation, made through the franchise’s charitable foundation, is going to the nonprofit’s Black Future Co-Op Fund, which was created to be a “collective hub for efforts to eradicate poverty, build generational wealth, preserve Black culture and celebrate the incredible resilience of the Black community.”

The fund specifically targets Black people in Washington who’ve been impacted by the ripples of racial oppression.

“It will invest in future generations of Black children born in Washington state — so that they may have an opportunity to not only survive, but to thrive,” a Seattle Foundation statement about the Black Future Co-Op Fund read.

The death of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, in custody of a Minneapolis police officer last month sparked protests nationwide and around the world against police brutality and systemic racism against Black People. The sports world has been entrenched in the conversations, and in NFL circles it’s brought debates surrounding Colin Kaepernick’s kneeling gesture in 2016 back to the forefront.

The Seahawks are among the NFL teams that have donated to causes advocating for racial equity and justice since Floyd’s death.


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A number of Seahawks players have been vocal in their condemnation of systemic racism in recent weeks, including quarterback Russell Wilson, linebacker Bobby Wagner, left tackle Duane Brown and receivers D.K. Metcalf and Tyler Lockett.

The Seahawks dedicated a virtual team meeting earlier this month to allow players to express their feelings about Floyd’s death and the state of race relations in the country. Wagner and linebacker K.J. Wright have lauded coach Pete Carroll for facilitating an inclusive environment where all players can voice their emotions.

A Seahawks contingent that included Carroll and general manager John Schneider participated in a march last Saturday in support of the Black Lives Matters movement arranged by Tiffany Chancellor and Nathalie Wright, the wives of retired Legion of Boom legend Kam Chancellor and Wright, respectively.

“All that’s happening is generating new conversations and new awareness that has to happen for us to support the movement to make the big changes,” Carroll told reporters on a Zoom call last week, in part. “We can talk about it all we want, but we have to do stuff.”

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Ben Arthur covers sports for SeattlePI. He can be reached by email at @benyarthur.